Dora's Nursing

sarahsaysmd:

In med school, taking notes is hard because there’s SO much material. I remember going through one of my lectures and wondering how the hell I was going to simplify it to something I could actually remember. I usually make what are called “study sheets” after each lecture, and this is how I do them!

  • If there’s learning objectives, follow those. Use them to guide your notes. If there’s not, then use your intuition (based on what was heavily emphasized or covered the most) to figure out where to focus your notetaking. Just make sure you’ve organized everything in your head before putting it down to paper, because notes only work if they’re clear! 
  • Use categories to break up your learning. In one lecture there’s often multiple components, so I use headings to separate the main points. That way they don’t all blur together in my head.
  • Whenever possible, make charts, diagrams, or drawings. I can’t tell you the amount of times I’ve remembered something on a test because I took the time to draw it out! If you’re a kinesthetic or visual learner, this is super helpful. It really simplifies the material and organizes it thoroughly. It’s much easier to study from a clear chart than a block of text.
  • When you do use text, keep it concise. Use different colors to write out key phrases and terms, and try not to write out paragraphs and paragraphs. Sometimes, it unavoidable, and you need a lot of text to understand a key concept. Short and sweet wherever possible, though, makes life easier for you! 
  • Transform, transform, transform. Always try to put things in your own words wherever you can. Manipulate the material so that it coincides with what you’ve learned. When you think about a topic from multiple perspectives, you understand it a million times better.
  • When reviewing notes, read them aloud! Sometimes, I cover up one section and say everything I can remember about it. Then I check to see if I missed anything. It’s a great way to review (might be awkward if you have roommates, but mine is used to my impromptu lectures by now!). 
thisfuturemd:

dontget2close:

seriously my partner was on like 3 steps for an ileostomy takedown

Yep.

thisfuturemd:

dontget2close:

seriously my partner was on like 3 steps for an ileostomy takedown

Yep.

nursetinkerbell:

Working on my second assignment for nursing theory. I need to finish it today… #nurseonwork #brainsatwork #upou #mastersdegree #criticalnursing #motivated

nursetinkerbell:

Working on my second assignment for nursing theory. I need to finish it today… #nurseonwork #brainsatwork #upou #mastersdegree #criticalnursing #motivated

cranquis:

For months, the Ebola epidemic was a terrible problem Today, the CDC confirmed the first case of Ebola diagnosed in the U.S.: a man who was traveling in Liberia and is now at a hospital in Dallas. Should you panic about Ebola now? Nope, and here’s why.

The bottom line is that Ebola spreads only through the direct contact with bodily fluids—making it a whole lot harder to spread than the airborne common flu. We also know exactly how to stop Ebola; the crisis in Africa has gotten so bad due to lack of healthcare infrastructure.

#medblr/healthcare workers, know the facts — cuz you’re going to be bombarded with panic-laden questions about Ebola now.

Yes, veins do roll.

cranquis:

From this blogger’s review of the book:

We are healthier, but we are increasingly being told we are sick. We are labeled with diagnoses that may not mean anything to our health. People used to go to the doctor when they were sick, and diagnoses were based on symptoms. Today diagnoses are increasingly made on the basis of detected abnormalities in people who have no symptoms and might never have developed them. Overdiagnosis constitutes one of the biggest problems in modern medicine. Welch explains why and calls for a new paradigm to correct the problem.

The “risk/benefit ratio” for tests/interventions is a very important topic in modern medicine. And IMO, med students are taught very well how to know/emphasize the potential benefits of various medications and screening tests, but NOT enough about the subtle risks of “over-treatment” in situations where the patient has no symptoms.

(Thanks to long-time Cranquistador doctom666 for the link!)

nursingmemes:

NCLEX traps

nursingmemes:

NCLEX traps

healthcareinfoguide:

…..now trying to take a deep breath and imagine that the doomsayers are inaccurate in there predictions.

And trust in my immune system and aggressive containment.

elops:

A normal ECG on top, and an ECG of a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and atrial fibrillation below.

I couldn’t not share this.

dancingnurse-ed:

(Yikes). You’re still a relatively new RN, or maybe everyone else scampers like mice when the choice to be in charge is decided - and today you found yourself stuck on the other end of the assignment sheet; what happens next?

1. Stay calm. Remember it’s only 12 hours.

2. Think of it like…